The Language of Flowers: A treasury of traditional meanings

Hello my loves!

This is a bit of a different book for me, isn’t it?? The Language of Flowers

For those who may be unaware, last year I finally got around to reading A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness. The story was cool, but I took two primary things away from that book: an interest in floriography – flower language – and an interest in alchemy. You can take an academic out of her office, but…. she’ll still find something to research. Plus, alchemy just sounds friggin’ cool. I am, however, digressing. The first takeaway was flower language. Naturally, the first thing I did (before finishing A Discovery, actually) was plumb the local community library for the most reputable-seeming titles on floriography and alchemy. There were… three titles per topic that I thought seemed legitimate. So, you know…anyone that wants to contribute to the Printed Pages & Coffee Library, please feel free.

This here is book 1 of 3 for floriography, and it is really intriguing what you could say to someone back in the day without ever uttering a word or sparing a glance in their direction.

Pissed off with the (ex)boyfriend? St John’s Wort and yellow Sultan.

Amused at someone being pissed off at you? Saffron Crocus and Harlequin.

Getting married? American Linden and Flowering Dogwood.

I mean, you could say anything. You could give someone line and item about exactly how you feel and why you feel it, and you could say it with plants. How very civilized.

This one is more of a dictionary, you could say. Find your feeling – and there’s the plant you need to express that feeling. Let me tell you, having common Willow delivered to someone is a real sting in the tail.

If you are interested in finding out about exactly what that last bunch of flowers meant, then I recommend you have a look at this one.

 

Image credit: my photo of the library copy of the book.



Categories: Book Reviews, Nonfiction Reviews

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